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Obama Just Knocked Out A Confederate General

The school, with a 90-95% Black population, was the last of three in the district named after Confederate leaders. With this renaming, no other schools in the area carry the legacy of the Confederate States of America.

The renaming of the school to Barack Obama Elementary was a community effort. Students, faculty, and administrators submitted suggestions to the school board and voted online.

Not everyone was excited about the school being named after Barack Obama. Some school board members preferred naming the school after local heroes who more directly impacted the community.

This includes Albert Norrell, a longtime Richmond educator, and Barbara Johns, a Civil Rights leader who led a school strike.

Other school board members felt the wrong Obama was chosen. With the former First Lady’s track record of leading various education-related initiatives, they preferred the school be named after Michelle Obama.

At the end of the day, though, the students at this predominately Black school are no longer haunted by a namesake who supported the enslavement of their ancestors.

Famous Black people who were Immigrants

Marcus Garvey was a Jamaican-born political leader and activist who strongly advocated for self-sufficiency of our communities. Garvey led the Pan-Africanism movement that encouraged the descendents of African enslaved people to see themselves as a united global Black community.

Lupita Nyong’o is an Academy-Award winning Kenyan actress, born in Mexico. She has received critical acclaim for her raw portrayals of strong, powerful Black female leads.

Most recently, we saw her kick major butt as the character Nakia in the record-breaking film “Black Panther.” I wonder if Trump saw that one.

Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was awarded the prestigious MacArthur Genius Grant in 2008 for her “extraordinary originality and dedication in [her] creative pursuits.”

Her vibrant literary works are infused with her African heritage and immigrant experience.

Trump wants our armed forces to protect us from space threats, right? He should look into the work of African immigrants like Ave Kludze, a Ghanaian senior NASA spacecraft systems engineer.

In 2004, Kludze developed the Extravehicular Activity Infrared (EVA IR) camera for space-walking astronauts. His camera technology may help discover and prevent some of the problems that lead to the disintegration of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

And of course, where would we be without our exceptional 44th President of the United States Barack Obama?

His father, Barack Obama Sr., was a native of Kenya as well. Perhaps Trump wants to keep immigrants out so we don’t get another Obama.

Spiritually Transmitted Disease

A baby’s skin is sensitive. You cannot let just any and everybody kiss your baby – people have germs and all kinds of lip and mouth diseases. The same way you have to protect a baby is the same way you have to guard your heart. Test the spirit. You can catch STD’s – Spiritually Transmitted Diseases from folks who look healthy.

Patrick Weaver

Arise From The Ashes

Title: Arise From The Ashes

Author; Paulette Harper

Publisher: Thy Word Publishing

Number of Pages: 119

About The Author

Beginning her career in 2008, Paulette is an award-winning, bestselling author and the founder of WNL Coaching and Marketing Services. Along with being an ordained Elder, she is the author of several books and founder of Write Now Literary Virtual Book Tours, a service to help promote authors of the Christian genre and authors of clean books.As an inspirational and motivational speaker, Elder Paulette’s desire is to empower, influence and cultivate women to move forward while dealing with issues that hinder women from becoming all they are created to be. Her topics are biblically sound and pertinent to the needs of today’s women. Paulette is a wife, mother, grandmother and Bible teacher. Paulette has appeared on numerous radio and Television shows. Combining enthusiasm with an energetic speaking style, audiences describe Paulette’s presentation as inspiring, enriching and encouraging. She is committed to speaking a message that is always uplifting and edifying.

As a writing coach, she is the visionary behind her own writing ministry called “Write Now,” a literary program that specializes in coaching aspiring writers in the areas of creativity, development, and publication of Christian books. She provides her listeners with tools, resources, and opportunities to help them succeed in the writing business.Her books have ranked consecutively on the Black Christian Publishers Bestsellers List for Independent Publishers (non-fiction category).

Her topics are biblically sound and pertinent to the needs of today’s women. Paulette is a wife, mother, grandmother and Bible teacher. Paulette has appeared on numerous radio and Television shows. Combining enthusiasm with an energetic speaking style, audiences describe Paulette’s presentation as inspiring, enriching and encouraging. She is committed to speaking a message that is always uplifting and edifying.

As a writing coach, she is the visionary behind her own writing ministry called “Write Now,” a literary program that specializes in coaching aspiring writers in the areas of creativity, development, and publication of Christian books. She provides her listeners with tools, resources, and opportunities to help them succeed in the writing business.Her books have ranked consecutively on the Black Christian Publishers Bestsellers List for Independent Publishers (non-fiction category).
You can view Paulette’s Informations at the following below:

http://www.pauletteharper.com

http://wnlbooktours.com/

About This Book

Arise from the Ashes, are stories of hope from seven women from all walks of life. These women have gone through the fire, walked in places that others dare not tread, but women who are not ashamed of their scars and willing to bare it all.
They share their journey of going from trials to triumph and pain to purpose. Arise from the Ashes is filled with inspiration, wisdom and life’s lessons from women who have endured personal pain and have come through empowered, encouraged and victorious.

The Book Review About Arises From The Ashes

Arise From The Ashes draws a personal images from these women writers to shows that God wants us to know that our lives isn’t over. The readers need to positions themselves and declare they are going to take God at His word. As long that you have the breath to breathe, there is still great hope and promise for a greater tomorrow. You need to capture every moment and press your way through God’s grace and His power will destroy any bondage that holds us in prison. We as the people shouldn’t allow past experiences to hinder you from moving into your purpose. We shouldn’t allow our past to negatively affect our future. In the beginning there may be obstacles , but it is really worth the fight because the rewards at the end will be worthy.

“Arise From the Ashes” created by Paulette Harper, and with guest Writers: Yolando Cooksey, Donna Moses, Cassietta Jefferson, Angie Jones, Sydney Delatorre and Michelle Mills all written their personal story with obstacles in their own lives. When I began reading “Arise From The Ashes”, I was initially taken aback by the controversial topic in the first Chapter. As I continued go forth in my reading that I became more inspires by the Writers’ circumstances. Each testimony shared in “Arise From The Ashes” draws a picture that provided a fascinated images into the lives of these Christian Women whose personal storms could have crippled them , although the Grace of God, they came out in victory. All the stories doesn’t tell the same or a similar situation, yet each testimony display with unique picture teaches the readers about how each of these women of faith life can become entangled by obstacles whether if you are married, single, a mother, a father, a son, a daughter or working in the ministry. Those storms touches us all whether we want to admit it or not. We don’t have to go looking for obstacles; they always find us. It is up to us how we are going to respond to obstacles. These women of faith took charges of their obstacles is truly evident in “Arise From the Ashes”. They are warriors and they wasn’t gonna let those obstacles hold them in bondages. We all can learn from each of these ladies. The question we should ask ourselves, “This is my obstacles, but what am I going to do about my obstacles?” All of these writers guide us through the moments that catapulted the transformation.

The best part about “Arise From The Ashes”, none of the writers didn’t make any excuses for making wrong decisions in their lives. Instead of blaming others for their mistakes, they took responsibility for their actions that allows them to move forward to greatness.This life learning experience should empower the readers the hope that comes to existence from obtain knowledge that mistakes need not become a life long prison sentence. After reading “Arise From The Ashes” that I wanted to celebrate life along with each of these writers. I am so glad that they all shared their stories with us and Praise Him for all that the Lord has done great things in their lives. Arise From The Ashes means that we all got the victory through Christ Jesus. Don’t give up and fight for victory. Please read this book for yourself and I planning to use this book for my clients in the mental health Inpatient unit at Metropolitan Hospital.

Each testimony shared in “Arise From The Ashes” draws a picture that provided a fascinated images into the lives of these Christian Women whose personal storms could have crippled them , although the Grace of God, they came out in victory. All the stories doesn’t tell the same or a similar situation, yet each testimony display with unique picture teaches the readers about how each of these women of faith life can become entangled by obstacles whether if you are married, single, a mother, a father, a son, a daughter or working in the ministry. Those storms touches us all whether we want to admit it or not. We don’t have to go looking for obstacles; they always find us. It is up to us how we are going to respond to obstacles. These women of faith took charges of their obstacles is truly evident in “Arise From the Ashes”. They are warriors and they wasn’t gonna let those obstacles hold them in bondages. We all can learn from each of these ladies. The question we should ask ourselves, “This is my obstacles, but what am I going to do about my obstacles?” All of these writers guide us through the moments that catapulted the transformation.

The best part about “Arise From The Ashes”, none of the writers didn’t make any excuses for making wrong decisions in their lives. Instead of blaming others for their mistakes, they took responsibility for their actions that allows them to move forward to greatness.This life learning experience should empower the readers the hope that comes to existence from obtain knowledge that mistakes need not become a life long prison sentence. After reading “Arise From The Ashes” that I wanted to celebrate life along with each of these writers. I am so glad that they all shared their stories with us and Praise Him for all that the Lord has done great things in their lives. Arise From The Ashes means that we all got the victory through Christ Jesus. Don’t give up and fight for victory. Please read this book for yourself and I planning to use this book for my clients in the mental health Inpatient unit at Metropolitan Hospital.
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This Is Why Muhammad Ali was the Most Hated Man In America

On April 28, 1967, Ali refused to be drafted into the Vietnam War. He cited his religious beliefs as his reason. He believed, as a Black man, that he could not fight for a racist country.

For three years, Ali was banned from boxing. The federal government took away his Heavyweight title and he suffered his first loss to Joe Frazier in the “Fight of the Century” on March 8, 1971. Later that year, the Supreme Court overturned his conviction for evading the draft. It would take another three years to fight Frazier again.

Ali risked his livelihood, his reputation and legacy to stand up for what he believed. He realized fighting America’s war while Black people died in the streets due to police violence and racism was something he couldn’t stomach. Today, former 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick protested racism in America and, like Ali, lost valuable years as a professional athlete because of it. But, if you ask him, he’ll tell you it was worth it.

This Is Why The Black Churches Were Dangerous

A former slave who bought his own freedom, Richard Allen was the founder of the first AME Church. After moving to Philadelphia, he became a licensed minister at St. George’s Methodist Church in 1786. With anti-slavery being a core value in Methodism, Allen quickly drew a large Black congregation to the white church, but this angered white members.

White preachers, who also were Allen’s supervisors, treated its Black members as second-rate, forcing them to segregate from white patrons. As Allen witnessed this racial discrimination, he worked to leave St. George’s. He wanted to start a church for Black people by Black people. But the white ministers wouldn’t let him go so easily.

To combat their control, he and colleague Absalom Jones founded the Free African Society (FAS), a nondenominational mutual aid group that helped newly freed Blacks become self-sustaining leaders within the larger Black community. As the number of Black members increased, the less control the white ministry held over Allen and his following.

From FAS, Allen formed the first AME Church in 1794, rooted in Black activism and progression. This church would go on to produce Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, the first Black church leader to publicly state that “God is a Negro.” As the first Black denomination, today the church has exponentially grown to an estimated 2.5 million members around the world, forming a united, global community.

Strongholds of Faith

Sometimes God puts us in pressurized situations to produce stronger faith. God is not working on the prayer, God is working on your strength — your blessing is outside of your comfort zone, it required more patience than you had, it required more trust than you had and it will only manifest when you’re at peace even though you’re in pieces.

I’m standing in agreement with you for this season of stretching, growing and refining. Praying for an abundance of grace to overtake you and keep you while you and God walk through this valley to victory. Amen. Patrick Weaver

Why Did Sean Combs Back Away From The NFL And You Should Too

Diddy says he was one of the final bidders, but lost interest once the league announced its new policy that requires players to stand for the national anthem or face fines.

“I don’t want to be associated with oppressing black men. I don’t want to be associated with telling grown ass men what they can do and cannot do.” – Diddy

Diddy also expressed support for players who choose the protest the rule, likening them to athletes who protested before them.

Remember that Black athletes like Muhammed Ali and Jim Brown used their power to protest for civil and human rights.

If Diddy can walk away from the business opportunity of owning a team, then we should be able to stop supporting the NFL. We shouldn’t support an organization that is willing to oppress the the rights of its employees in order to detract from the real issues – racial inequality and police brutality.

The Truth About Black Ancestry In The U.S.A.

During the slave trade, Africans were kidnapped from Africa to be shipped as cargo where they were sold into slavery and forced to toil the rest of their lives in the Americas.

This is different from immigrants who decided to come to the United States to seek safety, resettlement, and freedom.

Many immigrants and their descendants can travel back to their homeland if they have the means to do so. But the Middle Passage that Africans endured was a one way trip with no chance of return.

The descendants of immigrants are no longer immigrants, but full citizens. Meanwhile, the legal status as slaves was hereditary, meaning it was passed down to children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and generations beyond.

The vast majority of immigrants arrive in ethnic enclaves, people who share the same language, culture, and religion, and establish those communities in America. However, slavers ripped Africans from their respective lands and purposefully mixed them up by culture to keep them from communing.

The majority of the descendants from immigrants can identify their ancestral lands.But those of us who descend from enslaved Africans call ourselves Black American – not Ghanaian, Nigerian, or Sierra Leonean Americans – specifically because of this rupture and exile.